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Family Services Directory - 0-19

Education

Young child colouring in at a table

Bracknell Forest is an inclusive local authority and most children and young people, including those with more complex special educational needs, will attend a local mainstream school.

We are keen that our children and young people with special educational needs and disability get the right support from as early as possible, so they achieve the best possible outcomes to be well-prepared for life as adults. We recognise that supporting our children and young people towards greater independence and employability can be life-transforming, and will ensure the best opportunities for:

  • education and/or employment
  • independent living
  • participating in society - including having friends, participating in, and contributing to the local community
  • being as healthy as possible.

In this section, you will be able to find information on how your child can access the right support, which is graduated to respond their specific level of needs.  For most children and young people with special educational needs, their needs will be met through additional school support SEN Support (for Children and young people with Special Educational Needs) . For those with more complex needs, they may need an Education, Health and Care Plan.

Children with SEN may find it harder to learn than most children of the same age and some children will need extra or different help.

If you think your child may have special educational needs, contact the person in your child’s school or nursery responsible for special educational needs. This person is called the SEN Coordinator or SENCO. If your child isn’t in a school or pre-school provision contact your GP.

The Information, Advice & Support Service (formerly Parent Partnership)  provides confidential and impartial advice and information to support parents/carers and children and young people who have, or may have Special Educational Needs & Disabilities (SEND) in Bracknell Forest.

Local authorities may be able to provide your child with free or partially subsidised transport to their school if they are eligible.

Frequently Asked Questions:

 

What does special educational needs mean?

What does ‘special educational needs’ mean?

Children and young people with SEN all have learning difficulties or disabilities that make it harder for them to learn than most children and young people of the same age. These children and young people may need extra or different help from that given to others. The definition of special educational needs as set out in the SEND Code is as follows:

“A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for him or her. -- A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she:

 

  • has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age, or

 

  • has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools or mainstream post-16 institutions

 

A child under compulsory school age has special educational needs if he or she is likely to fall within the definition above when they reach compulsory school age.”

 

English as an Additional Language

 

If your child’s first language is not English, that does not mean they have a learning difficulty. The law says that children and young people do not have learning difficulties just because their first language is not English, although, of course, some of these children and young people may have learning difficulties as well.

 

 Four Areas of SEN:

 

Children and young people with SEN may need extra help because of a range of needs. The 0-25 SEND Code of Practice set out four areas of SEN:

 

  • Communicating and interacting – for example, where children and young people have speech, language and communication difficulties which make it

difficult for them to make sense of language or to understand how to communicate effectively and appropriately with others

 

  • Cognition and learning – for example, where children and young people learn at a slower pace than others their age, have difficulty in understanding parts of the curriculum, have difficulties with organisation and memory skills, or have a specific difficulty affecting one particular part of their learning performance such as in literacy or numeracy

 

  • Social, emotional and mental health difficulties – for example, where children and young people have difficulty in managing their relationships with other people, are withdrawn, or if they behave in ways that may hinder their and

other children’s learning, or that have an impact on their health and wellbeing

 

  • Sensory and/or physical needs – for example, children and young people with visual and/or hearing impairments, or a physical need that means they must have additional ongoing support and equipment
  • Some children and young people may have SEN that covers more than one of these areas.

What can I expect if my child has a SEN or disability?

Most children of school age who have SEN or disabilities will attend a mainstream school.  All children with special educational needs (SEN) or disabilities should have their needs met.  Nurseries, schools and colleges have a legal duty to support children and young people with special educational needs and disability and treat them fairly.

If your child has SEN, their school has a legal duty to use its ‘best endeavours’ – that means to do its very best to give your child the support they need. This includes:


• Identifying their potential areas of difficulty as early as possible and ensuring:
• Good lesson planning
• High quality teaching.
• Additional support where needed.

Early years providers, schools and colleges should know precisely where children and young people with SEN are in their learning and development. They should:


• ensure decisions are take into account the view of you and your child, and young
people.
• have high ambitions and set stretching targets for them
• track their progress towards these goals
• keep under review the additional or different provision that is made for them
• promote positive outcomes in the wider areas of personal and social development, and
• ensure that the approaches used are based on the best possible evidence and are
having the required impact on progress.

What does disability mean?

Many children and young people who have SEN may have a disability.

 

Under the Equality Act 2010 – that is ‘…a physical or mental impairment which has a long-term and substantial adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to- day activities’.

 

‘Long-term’ is defined as ‘a year or more’ and ‘substantial’ is defined as ‘more than minor or trivial’.

 

This definition includes sensory impairments such as those affecting sight or hearing, and long-term health conditions such as asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer.

My child is not making progress, what could I do?

If you think your child has SEN, you should talk to your child’s early education setting, school, college or other provider. They will discuss any concerns you have. You will be involved, and your views will be needed throughout the process, and you will be kept up to date with the progress made. Young people aged 16 to 25 will be fully involved in designing their own SEN support and provision. You may be contacted – for example in schools, this will be by your child’s teacher or SENCO – if your early years setting, school or college think your child needs support.

 

Class and subject teachers, supported by the head teacher, should make regular assessments of progress for all pupils. This should identify whether or not your child is making less than expected progress given their age and individual circumstances.

 

What does less than expected progress mean?

 

 

This means that your child’s progress:

  • is significantly slower than that of their peers
  • your child is behind their peers in attainment.

 

Progress can be looked at in areas other than attainment – for instance where a pupil needs to make additional progress with wider development or social needs to make a successful transition to adult life.

If my child has SEN, how will their support be decided?

Where it is decided that your child does have SEN:

 

 

  • You, your child and teaching staff should be involved in deciding the best support for your child so that they can achieve outcomes.
  • This SEN Support will be set out in a SEN Support Plan.
  • You and your child must be formally informed that special educational provision is being made.
    • The decision should be recorded in the school records.
    • A clear date for reviewing progress should be agreed.
    • Arrangements for appropriate support should be made through the school’s approach to SEN Support.

What type of support can they get?

My child does not have an EHC Plan - can they attend a special school or post-16 setting?

The SEND Code of Practice says that where a child or young person has SEN but does not have an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan, they must be educated in a mainstream setting, except in specific circumstances they may attend a special school / special post-16 institution:

 

  • Where they are to be assessed for an EHC plan or:
    • There has been a change in their circumstances and an emergency placement is made by the local authority. An EHC needs assessment or re- assessment should be started immediately.
    • Where they are in hospital and admitted to a special school which is established in a hospital, or:
    • where they are admitted to a special academy (including a special free school) whose academy arrangements allow it to admit children or young people with SEN.

 

The above must be with the agreement of:

 

  • the child’s parent or the young person
  • the head teacher/principal of the special school or special post-16 institution
  • anyone providing advice for the assessment.

My child has an EHC Plan, which type of school can I chose for them?

You can request mainstream or special school/setting. As a parent or carer, you have the right to request a particular school, college or other institution, and the local authority must comply with this unless:

  • it would be unsuitable for the age, ability, aptitude or SEN of the child or young person, or
  • the attendance of the child or young person there would be incompatible with the efficient education of others (the children and young people with whom the child or young person with an EHC plan will directly come into contact on a regular day-to-day basis) or the efficient use of resources.

What is the role of special schools?

The SEND Code says thatChildren and young people with SEN have different needs and can be educated effectively in a range of mainstream or special settings’.

 

Alongside a child/young person’s entitlement to attend a mainstream school, parents of children with an EHC plan and young people with such a plan have the right to seek a place at a special school, special post-16 institution or specialist college.

 

The value of special schools and settings in meeting children/young people’s SEND needs is set out in the SEND Code, as they have an important role in providing for children and young people with SEN and in working collaboratively with mainstream and special settings to develop and share expertise and approaches.

How will I know what the school’s offer is to children and young people with SEN?

Schools (including nursery schools and academies) have a duty to publish on their school websites information about what they provide for children and young people with SEN.

In addition to a SEN Information Report, most schools in Bracknell Forest also publish their ‘SEND Local Offer’ on their school website. This sets out SEND information in a standardised format, enabling parents/carers to compare and contrast SEN provisions available in different schools.

Will my child be entitled to have their needs met?

All children with special educational needs (SEN) or disabilities should have their needs met. Every school is required to meet the SEN of the children or young people that they support. Mainstream schools have a legal duty to use their best endeavours to make sure that a child with SEN gets the support they need – this means doing everything they can to meet children and young people’s SEN. And this should be underpinned by high quality teaching.

 

Potential areas of difficulty should be identified and addressed at the outset.

Lessons should be planned to address potential areas of difficulty and to remove barriers to pupil achievement. In many cases, such planning will mean that pupils with SEN and disabilities will be able to study the full national curriculum.

 

Early years providers, schools and colleges should know precisely where children and young people with SEN are in their learning and development. They should:

 

  • ensure decisions are take into account the view of you and your child, and young people.
  • have high ambitions and set stretching targets for them
  • track their progress towards these goals
  • keep under review the additional or different provision that is made for them
    • promote positive outcomes in the wider areas of personal and social development, and
    • ensure that the approaches used are based on the best possible evidence and are having impact on progress.

What types of school places are available if I and my child live in Bracknell Forest?

Most children and young people are educated in mainstream schools and this includes those with Education, Health and Care Plans.

 

A small number of children will need additional support and depending on complexity of need, will be able to access this through more specialist provision. The types of school places are listed here:

 

  • Mainstream school with a package of support, either through SEN Support or also with an Education, Health and Care Plan.
  • Mainstream schools with resource provision
  • Special School
  • Section 41 schools.

 

Schools List: https://bracknellforest.fsd.org.uk/kb5/bracknell/directory/family.page?familychannel= 6_2

 

Section 41 schools: https://bracknellforest.fsd.org.uk/kb5/bracknell/directory/service.page?id=ZH5_zKdN P-4&familychannel=6

My Child is in youth custody. How will their special educational needs be met?

Youth in Custody

 

If you are a parent of a child, or are a young person, who is detained there are principles set out in the SEND Code to ensure the child/young person is supported:

 

  • Your views, wishes and feelings are important and must be listened to.

 

  • The timely identification and assessment of special educational needs and provision of high quality support at the earliest opportunity, whether the young person, or your child has an EHC plan or not.

 

  • Greater collaboration between education, health and social care with a focus on continuity of provision; both when you, if you are a young person, or your child enters custody and after release. Custodial sentences are often short, it is therefore important for decisions to be made as soon as possible to ensure appropriate provision is put in place without delay.

 

The rights of the detained young person or child are set out in the SEND Code:

 

These rights include:

 

  • The right to keep an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan on hold

while being detained.

 

  • Having special provision as set out in the EHC Plan continued during custody (including health) arranged by the home local authority - as far as is practical.
    • The right to request an EHC plan while the child/young person is detained (or youth offending team and education provider could do this on your behalf with your permission) This can begin while your child -or you as a young person- are in custody to ensure there is appropriate support while being detained or when released.

 

  • If your request is turned down, you have the right to appeal to the SEN

and Disability Tribunal.

 

  • An EHC plan cannot be ceased when a child or young person enters custody. If a detained person has an EHC Plan before being detained (or one is completed while the detained person is in the relevant youth accommodation) Bracknell Forest Local Authority must arrange appropriate special educational provision for the detained person while he or she is detained.

 

  • The provision on the EHC Plan must be continued. If it is not practical to arrange the provision specified in the EHC plan, special educational and health provision corresponding as closely as possible to that in the EHC plan must be arranged.

 

  • If it appears that the special educational provision or health provision in the EHC plan are no longer appropriate, the local authority or the health commissioner must change this.

 

  • The EHC Plan must be maintained and reviewed when the detained

person is released.

 

  • Bracknell Forest Local Authority would also need to consider whether any social care needs identified in the EHC plan will remain while the detained person is in custody and provide appropriate provision if necessary

 

  • Where a detained person does not have an EHC plan, the appropriate person or the person in charge of the relevant youth accommodation can request an assessment of the detained person’s post-detention EHC needs from the local authority. The appropriate person can appeal to the First- tier Tribunal (SEN and Disability) if they disagree with the decisions of the local authority about certain matters.

 

  • Anyone else, including the Youth Offending Team (YOT) and the education provider in custody, has a right to bring the detained person to the notice of Bracknell Forest Local Authority as someone who may have special educational needs and a decision will be made as to whether an assessment of their post-detention EHC needs is necessary.

 

Contacts:

Bracknell Forest Youth Offending Service: 01344 354300

IASS: Information, Advice and Support Service: 01344 354011

The Council for Disabled Children: 0207 843 1900

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